July 2019 Issue of LabCoP Quarterly

The 2nd Quarter issue of ASLM’s LabCoP Quarterly is hot off the press and free to download below. LabCoP Quarterly is designed to keep you informed of what’s happening in our field and in our network: interviews with global health experts, ECHO session highlights, upcoming events and more. Stay connected to the LabCoP community and expand your network with LabCoP Quarterly.

Download the LabCoP Newsletter here.

HIV prevention research workshop – 21-22 August 2019, Harare

Are you a young, budding biomedical researcher?

Don’t miss this two-day scientific training workshop which will provide research tools, networking and funding resources for young investigators in the HIV prevention field.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION AND REGISTRATION OPEN

We invite young investigators from the SADC Region to submit their abstracts and contribute to the next generation HIV prevention research workshop taking place on 21-22 August 2019 in Harare, Zimbabwe

Abstracts can be submitted on the following topics

  • Addressing gaps in current PrEP and MPT research
  • Developing next-generation products for HIV prevention
  • Novel measures of PrEP product safety and adherence
  • The interface between HIV and HPV/Vaginal Microbiome
  • Socio-behavioral aspects of, and end user preferences for new HIV prevention modalities.
  • TB immunology and vaccines

The workshop will provide cutting-edge information and demonstrations through plenary sessions, and participants will gain hands-on training during breakout sessions in:

  • Laboratory endpoints of clinical studies
  • Phase I clinical trial design
  • End-user perspectives
  • Research methodologies in HIV prevention
  • Grant-writing

Our hope is that the Innovation in HIV Prevention Research Workshop provides a valuable focus on research and networking tools capable of sustaining young, local investigators researching next generation HIV prevention products.

Abstract submission deadline: 07 August 2019

Registration deadline: 14 August 2019

For more information contact: hivworkshopsecretariat@uzchs-ctrc.org

                                                     tmoyo@uzchs-ctrc.org

ZACB Flash eNews IFCC August 2019

Hello World, this is AFCC LabMed Internet Radio- ZACB Flash News. The 1st of July 2019 was a historic day when Professor Hilda Tendisa Marima-Matarira was appointed as the Board Chairman of Chitungwiza Central Hospital (CCH), the only ISO certified central hospital out of 5 such hospitals in Zimbabwe.

CCH is one of the five Central Hospital in Zimbabwe situated 30km south east of Harare. It looks after 3 million population from part of Manicaland Province to Mashonaland East Province.
In Mashonaland East Province, there are other hospitals under CCH. These are Marondera Provincial Hospital and Mahusekwa District hospitals plus many clinics. In Chitungwisa Central Business District (CBD), there are 4 clinics. These are St Marys, Zengeza, Seke North and Seke South. The central business district has some 400 000 plus population.
Chitungwiza Central Hospital delivers the highest number of babies in Zimbabwe per month @ 600 babies, but it has no maternity hospital. Top on the list of priorities of Prof. Matarira is to build via Private Public Partnership (PPP) a super special maternity hospital.

CCH sets on 17 Ha and 5 Ha of which has already been built. On the 12 Ha site plans to build a super specialities hospital are approved and now available. It will be a centre of excellence as a national supra referral hospital that will also attract Medical Tourism facilities in SADC and beyond. The hospital will have 7 floors, an additional 500 beds in addition to the current 500 beds. There are

about 100 Doctors, 550 Nurses plus 200 others are working in Chitungwiza Central Hospital.
We expect that the hospital will maintain an ISO certified status very soon. All these structures will also include 600 000 litre water tank solarisations of CCH and provision of 5 ambulances.
Thank you for taking time to read this article.

Professor H T Matarira
ZACB President: matarirah@yahoo.com
Chitungwiza Central Hospital
Box A 1877, AVONDALE
ZIMBABWE

IAS2019 – ASLM and WHO Launch HIV Molecular Diagnostics Toolkit to Improve Access to Viral Load Testing and Infant Diagnosis

IAS2019 – ASLM and WHO LaunchHIV Molecular Diagnostics Toolkit to Improve Access to Viral Load Testingand Infant Diagnosis  The long awaited ‘HIV Molecular Diagnostics Toolkit to Improve Access to Viral Load Testing and Infant Diagnosis’, which presents new and tried concepts for scaling up HIV viral load testing across settings, was launched during the ASLM- and WHO-hosted session, What’s new in diagnostics: Novel HIV molecular interventions to support expansion of viral load access at the ongoing International AIDS Society Conference IAS2019.
Currently, about half of patients on antiretroviral treatment have access to viral load testing; however, access remains focused within a small number of countries. To date, routine HIV viral load monitoring, which is considered the best method for monitoring antiretroviral treatment, has been fully implemented in 68% of low- and middle-income countries, and partially implemented in 20% of low- and middle-income countries with the highest burden of HIV. While plasma is the preferred specimen type for viral load testing, it can be restrictive in settings with limited infrastructure and cold chain availability, in addition to several challenges and barriers to widely scaling up viral load. Download the toolkit here.

HPA SECOND QUARTER NEWSLETTER 2019

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IAS 2019 21-24 July 2019: Mexico City, Mexico

This month’s edition of ASLM’s Point-of-Care News Digest provides details on two satellite sessions that focus on point-of-care (POC) and novel innovations in molecular diagnostics that ASLM & WHO will be co-hosting at the 10th IAS Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2019) to be held in Mexico City, Mexico from 21-24 July 2019. Strategies Towards Integrating Point-of-Care Testing Quality Assurance into Existing Quality Assurance Programs Session Chair – Dr Trevor Peter (CHAI) Success of disease control programs depends largely, amongst other things, on the accuracy and reliability of diagnostic testing. Compared to testing in traditional laboratory settings, testing performed outside of centralized laboratories with point-of-care (POC) technology introduces an array of new challenges. This satellite session seeks to create awareness and outline key elements to consider for the integration of POC testing such as those using automated closed systems into national QA programs. Venue: Casa del Diezmo 3 y 4 (SR6), Centro Citibanamex, Mexico City Time: 07:00 am – 08:30 am     RSVP For full details, click here  What’s new in Diagnostics: Novel HIV Molecular Interventions to Support Expansion of Viral Load Access Co-Chairs: Nqobile Ndlovu (ASLM) and Meg Doherty (WHO) Currently, approximately 50% of patients on antiretroviral treatment have access to viral load testing; however, access remains focused within a small number of countries. While plasma is the preferred specimen type for viral load testing, it can be restrictive in settings with limited infrastructure and cold chain availability. Additionally, several challenges and barriers remain to widely scaling up viral load. In this Satellite, ASLM, WHO and partners will present new and tried concepts for scaling up HIV viral load testing across settings – these concepts form a newly developed implementation best practices document to be launched during this session.   Venue: Casa del Diezmo 3 y 4 (SR6), Centro Citibanamex, Mexico City Time: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
RSVP
For full detail, click here ASLM is proud to be supported by Unitaid and partners [United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), Elizabeth Glaser Paediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF)]

ASLM Announces Confirmation of CEO

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (18 July 2019) – The African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) is pleased to announce that, Mr. Ndlovu Nqobile, who has been Acting Chief Executive Officer (Ag. CEO) since November 2018, has been confirmed as the new ASLM CEO.

‘Mr Ndlovu has demonstrated his acumen to lead this organization as seen in the last 8 months in his acting role,’ said Prof Prof Alash’le Abimiku, Chair of the ASLM Board of Directors and a professor at the Institute of Human Virology, Nigeria and University of Maryland, United States. ‘The ASLM Board of Directors is excited to have Mr Ndlovu as the new CEO of ASLM. We are confident that he will take ASLM to new heights in collaboration with key partners’, she added.

Mr. Ndlovu’s wealth of public health experience and management skills make him an ideal leader. He has over 10 years of experience managing regional laboratory strengthening programs in Africa and advocating for public health laboratories to achieve international accreditation. He has worked in the Caribbean region, where he introduced the stepwise laboratory improvement process that led to a number of laboratories achieving international standards.

‘Mr Ndlovu brings vast experience and commitment to the position,’ said Dr John Nkengasong, Director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. ‘He was at the founding of ASLM and has been part of the process all along to bring the organization to where it is today. He is a respected, steady and reliable hand that is greatly needed at this junction in ASLM’s evolution.’

‘Mr Ndlovu has demonstrated his acumen to lead this organization as seen in the last 8 months in his acting role,’ said Prof Prof Alash’le Abimiku, Chair of the ASLM Board of Directors and a professor at the Institute of Human Virology, Nigeria and University of Maryland, United States. ‘The ASLM Board of Directors is excited to have Mr Ndlovu as the new CEO of ASLM. We are confident that he will take ASLM to new heights in collaboration with key partners’, she added.

Mr. Ndlovu’s wealth of public health experience and management skills make him an ideal leader. He has over 10 years of experience managing regional laboratory strengthening programs in Africa and advocating for public health laboratories to achieve international accreditation. He has worked in the Caribbean region, where he introduced the stepwise laboratory improvement process that led to a number of laboratories achieving international standards.

‘Mr Ndlovu brings vast experience and commitment to the position,’ said Dr John Nkengasong, Director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. ‘He was at the founding of ASLM and has been part of the process all along to bring the organization to where it is today. He is a respected, steady and reliable hand that is greatly needed at this junction in ASLM’s evolution.’

For more information about ASLM, please visit: http://www.aslm.org.

CPD GUIDELINES

It has come to Council’s notice that since the introduction of Continuous Professional Development Programme in 2011, registered members of the medical laboratory profession continue to seek renewal of their practising licenses without furnishing administration office with pre-requisite CPD points.

Registered members have been giving various excuses as to why they were failing to acquire the required points.  Financial difficulties being the major reason why most members were failing to acquire the pre-requisite CPD points.

Council also noted with concern lack of interest to sponsor the worthy activity by companies that used to do so before. 

Therefore, in order to assist registered  members acquire the pre-requisite CPD points for year 2020 practising certificate renewal, Council resolved that the administration office circulate  CPD guidelines.  Practitioners can acquire CPD points with activities such as departmental, interdepartmental or inter laboratories meetings.  Heads of laboratories will be guided by the attached document in awarding registered members of the profession CPD points.  Presenters will receive extra points for presenting.

The Registrar’s office would like to take this opportunity to advise members that no practitioner will be allowed to renew year 2020 practising certificate without the pre-requisite CPD points.

AfSBT Newsletter July 2019

Editor’s messageIt is a great pleasure for me to share with you the first announcement for our upcoming congress. We are pleased to invite you to the 10th AfSBT International Congress which will be held from 20 to 23 April 2020 in Dakar, Senegal. The congress is organized in conjunction with the Ministry of Health and Social Action and the National Blood Transfusion Services of Senegal. The theme of the congress will be “Blood Transfusion and Health Priorities in Africa”. so please save the date and join us next year at the King Fahd Palace convention center in Dakar!.Read More….Cambodia undergoes Baseline assessmentThe AfSBT Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP) aims at supporting blood services to scale up transfusion safety through certification (at Step 1 or Step 2) and Accreditation (at Step 3). AfSBT embarks on providing the necessary Technical Assistance in form of education, training and mentoring of Blood Transfusion Services (BTSs). Through SWAP, BTSs get a greater assurance that the quality of services meets international standards. This in turn, gives confidence that the same level of service and safety is available throughout the area served by the organization. Cambodia National Blood Transfusion Services has therefore enrolled into the programme and is currently pursuing Step 1 Certification.Read More….AfSBT Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP) “Flexible Approach, Quality Results”The AfSBT Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP), has been implemented with the goal of maintaining and enhancing the quality and safety of blood transfusion in Africa. The accreditation programme is based on Standards prepared by a sub-group of the Task Team for Accreditation established by AfSBT. Accreditation by the AfSBT provides formal recognition that the blood transfusion facility meets all the requirements of the stipulated step of the AfSBT Standards: Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (ACR-R01). The competence of the facility to perform the functions to be accredited will be assessed through a formal process designed to show that the functions routinely satisfy the stipulated criteria and that the documented Quality System is fully implemented to support these functions. Read More…. AfSBT Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP): Financial flexibility in limited resources settingsThe certification or accreditation of a blood transfusion facility by Africa Society for Blood Transfusion (AfSBT) under its Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP) is based on the AfSBT Standards for Blood Transfusion. The SWAP provides formal recognition that the facility meets the requirements of the stipulated step of the programme, as formally assessed through a process designed to show that the functions routinely meet the requirements of the Standards and that the documented Quality System is fully implemented to support these functions.Read More….AfSBT Awards Free Associate Membership to National Blood Transfusion Services in AfricaAfSBT aims to provide access to the leadership of national blood services and help them stay informed about the society programmes, stay up to date with all information and business trends in the field of blood transfusion, and get free access to “Members-Only Section” on the AfSBT website with its exclusive educational materials, contents and benefits. Being an Associate member gives the BTS, its staff and other relevant partners in the respective country, the opportunity to stay connected and enjoy all the benefits of this membership as listed below:Read More….AnnouncementAfrica SanguineThe production team of Africa Sanguine invites members of the Africa Society for Blood Transfusion who are able to write in scientific French and English to offer their skills as translators for the journal. Persons who are interested can request more information from the Editor-in-Chief, Claire Armour Barrett, by emailing : africa.sanguine@afsbt.orgAfSBT ITWG and AfSBT Research ConsortiumThe AfSBT ITWG (itwg@afsbt.org) and AfSBT Research Consortium (research@afsbt org) have now established official emails for communication as given. You are all welcome to direct your queries and contributions on AfSBT ITWG and AfSBT Research Consortium issues to the respective email’s.AfSBT members free access to ISBT EducationAs a member of AfSBT you receive complimentary access to “ISBT Education”, the online learning environment presented by the International Society of Blood Transfusion. On ISBT Education you can access presentations from ISBT Regional and International Congresses and their associated learning quizzes free of charge. ISBT Education also includes an International Guideline Library with almost 300 scientific guideline documents from around the world. Also, an educational eBook and recordings of ISBT Webinars and Live Journal Clubs can be found on ISBT Education. We encourage you to take advantage of this unique educational opportunity. For more info, please contact info@afsbt.orgBritish Blood Transfusion Society (BBTS) offers a free affiliate membership to members of AfSBTBBTS is proud to offer a free affiliate membership to members of AfSBT as we pursue our aim of supporting transfusion professionals around the world. BBTS is dedicated to playing a leading role in safe and effective transfusion practice through the delivery of quality education opportunities, setting standards, and promoting research, development and innovation. Join BBTS and enjoy the benefits of affiliate membership including access to publications, bursaries to attend BBTS events, and the chance to contribute to a society that is dedicated to you. Join online today at www.bbts.org.uk/membershipIn this Issue:Editor’s MessageCambodia undergoes Baseline assessmentAfSBT Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP) “Flexible Approach, Quality Results”AfSBT Step-Wise Accreditation Programme (SWAP): Financial flexibility in limited resources settingsAfSBT Awards Free Associate Membership to National Blood Transfusion Services in AfricaUpcoming Events:AABB Annual meeting, October 19-22, 2019, San Antonio, TXISBT 30th Regional Congress, Bangkok, Thailand, November 16 – 19, 2019AfSBT 10th International Congress, Blood Transfusion and Health Priorities in Africa, 20 to 23 April 2020, Dakar, SenegalAnnouncement:Africa SanguineAfSBT ITWG and AfSBT Research ConsortiumAfSBT members free access to ISBT EducationBritish Blood Transfusion Society (BBTS) offers a free affiliate membership to members of AfSBT
Contact Us:Emailinfo@afsbt.orgMohammed Farouk: Managing DirectorHeidi Goubran: Editor, e-NewsletterJean-Baptiste Tapko: French EditorMolly Gondwe: Administration Officer

ASLM Monthly Updates June 2019

Here’s a summary of what’s been happening at ASLM in June 2019.
News ArticleASLM’s Laboratory Quality Program Supports One HealthSocial MediaAfrican Collaborative to Advance Diagnostics to Include a Focus on Pneumonia
Death in the water: African rivers awash with fatal antibiotics
NIH launches large TB prevention trial for people exposed to multidrug-resistant TB
CDC video “We can stop Ebola if we all work together” in French
Becoming malaria free by 2020
When it comes to climate change, don’t forget the microbes
Uganda and DRC Renew Commitment to Strengthen Cross-Border Disease Surveillance
ASLM’s Laboratory Quality Program Supports One Health
What’s behind PEPFAR’s funding cut threats?
Confirmation of case of ebola virus disease in Uganda
Immune cells play unexpected role in early tuberculosis infection
Adipogenesis, Adipocyte Function and Obesity Following HIV Infection, Antiretroviral Therapy, or Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)
Diagnostic accuracy study published on next-generation urine test to detect tuberculosis in HIV-positive peopleQuick LinksASLM Membership – Register Now!Lab Culture
ASLM LabMaP
ASLM LabCoP
ASLM Resources
Laboratory Accreditation/ SLIPTA
Contact Us
AJLM UpdatesOriginal ResearchMolecular detection of enterovirus D68 among children with acute respiratory tract infection in Ghana___Joyce A. Kubi, et al.
Brief ReportSeroprevalence of hepatitis B virus co-infection among HIV-1-positive patients in North-Central Nigeria: The urgent need for surveillance___Terver M. Akindigh, et al. AJLM is open accessNo fees for authors or readersNewslettersLabCoP‘s Latest Cookbook Recipe
ASLM Point-of-Care News Digest May 2019New ResourcesThe Missed Potential of CD4 and VL Testing
The Laboratory African Regional Collaborative (LARC) Project Workbook
Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Achieving UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 HIV Treatment Targets in Africa
Public-Private Partnership and Strengthening Laboratory Systems in Africa Supplement
Safety Familiarisation Course for African Healthcare Clinicians
Collection of Dried Blood Spot Specimen for Viral Load Testing
Quality Control and Method Validation Video Course
Early Infant Diagnosis Through Dried Blood Spot Collection
PEPFAR HIV Rapid Testing Continuous Quality Improvement
Considerations for Adoption and Use of Multi-Disease Testing Devices in Integrated Laboratory NetworksUpcoming Events11th International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics
IAS2019
3rd OCHEA International One Health Conference

Dr Nkengasong’s Shares his Vision for Africa CDC in the Lancet

In a Lancet perspective article of 29 June 2019, Geoff Wyatt writes on Dr John Nkengasong’s long-term vision for Africa CDC. The article looks back at Dr Nkengasong’s impressive career and track record, which equipped him to set out and build Africa CDC from scratch. Dr Nkengasong excelled in basic and field research as well as translating laboratory advice into practice during his years as branch chief at the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. As part of Dr Nkengasong’s goal of providing support to laboratory systems in Africa, he took a key role in establishing the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) in 2011 and mobilized global health stakeholders, Ministries of Health and the African Union behind this initiative. Today ASLM continues its role to advance various aspects of laboratory medicine across the continent and assists Africa CDC in achieving its goals under the laboratory network strategic pillar.

Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene, Tom Keyon, the CEO of Project Hope and Kevin de Cock, the Director of County CDC in Kenya, acknowledge the achievements of Dr Nkengasong in his various positions and responsibilities, and praise his capacity to mobilize Africa around his vision. Dr Nkengasong sees Africa CDC’s role as helping countries to do things that they cannot do by themselves, such as tackling cross-border health problems like Ebola outbreaks. Africa CDC also aims to help countries in things they should be doing for themselves, such as setting up stronger national public health systems. This vision is articulated around the notion that each member state should have strong national public health institutes (NPHI).

Currently, Africa CDC is focused on building strong networks of NPHIs, recruiting sufficiently skill staff at Africa CDC headquarters and ensuring that the 5 Africa CDC regional collaborating centers in Gabon, Egypt, Zambia, Kenya and Nigeria become operational. Reflecting on Dr Nkengasong’s task, Peter Piot and Kevin de Cock recognize that overcoming the heavy bureaucracy of the African Union and obtaining more independence for Africa CDC will be critical to the achievement of its goals.

ZACB LAUNCHES NATIONAL CANCER NUTRIETICS CAMPAIGN: INTEGRATED EARLY PREVENTION DIAGNOSTICS AND CURE

The Zimbabwe Association of Clinical Biochemists (ZACB) founded in 1992 made significant contribution in Cancer Nutrietics Campaign and Cure by launching a national programme together with the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MHCC) on 19th November 2018. The Honourable Minister of Health, Dr Obadia Moyo gave the guest speech and MHCC staff graced the occasion at the Holiday Inn in “sunshine” city of Harare, Zimbabwe.

The launch was honoured by the presence of Professor Tomris Ozben, IFCC Treasurer and Executive Board member and Board of Directors, IFCC Foundation for Emerging Nations (FEN) who has tenure at Akdeniz University in Turkey. She was visiting external examiner at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences.

Dr O Moyo’s highlights in his guest speech :

 Zimbabwe  has rates ofancer cases, some 7000 and 3500 cancer related deaths annually, a tip of the iceberg as reports are largely from two largest urban centres of Harare and Bulawayo.  20% of deaths are from nutritional and dietary contribution. For people living in Sub Saharan Africa there is a 9 times more risk of developing cancer and a 5 times more risk of dying from cancer related illnesses. Globally, emerging nations carry 57% of the cancer burden and 65% of cancer mortality as non communicable diseases are on the rise at 53%,. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) contribute 31% of total deaths globally. Such diseases include cancer, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition, cerebrovascular and heart diseases.

The foods we eat, air we breathe and water we drink may  metabolise to form oxidative free radicals which damage body cells, lower the body immunity and cause cancer. Viral co infections also integrate into body cells causing cancer. 43% of women Zimbabwe, die from cervical cancer and of these some 60% are HIV infected relating to high mortality of 3-4 deaths among women per day.

We need to protect the bodies from toxic damage by eating organic foods high in antioxidants namely mushrooms, avocados, dark grapes and pawpaw. Fruity diets starve cancer cells to death and keep the body alkalinised at pH of 7.26. We should eat ‘sadza’ from finger millet, sorghum and brown rice as these are healthier choices. Drinks of lemon ginger turmeric bicarbonate and apple vinegar are recommended.

Standard treatment of cancer includes surgery which may cause cancer metastasis, chemotherapy and radiotherapy toxic to healthy cells and promote body acidosis. Cancer with 100%  poor prognosis can be cured with medicines having available cheap natural micronutrients such as selenium.

Recommended healthy diet is 75% fresh unprocessed foods and 25% cooked, 80% base and 20% acidic from 32 alkaline forming foods high in antioxidants. These are olive oil, spinach, cabbage, lettuce, raspberries, guavas, avocados, sweet potatoes, broccoli, green teas, herbs and red wine, pecans, blue berries, peaches mushrooms, oats, kale, dark grapes, laboratory bush tomatoes and spinach, peas, beans, lentils, herbs and seeds. Acid forming foods includes meat (red & white), fish, eggs, grains and legumes.

Other causes of acid pH include foods high in acids, emotional stress, toxins overload, immune reactions, oxygen deprivation and other nutrients. The body pH can be monitored using simple urine stix.

Trace elements come from the soil. They can be decreased by 85% per 100 years of agriculture. Over 50 micronutrients can manage oxidative stress with deficiencies causing approximately 70 chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson’s disease, asthma, heart and infectious diseases etc.

 Evidence-Based Laboratory P4 Medicine. i.e. Preventative, Personalised, Predictive and Participatory is the scientific basis of health which integrates healthcare and makes it accessible, affordable (decreases cost by over 3000 times) and available from local resources. Prevention via HIE, early detection via POCs, counselling and treatments via effective POC Devices and nutrietics. Patients can be tested and treated at presentation efficiently. There is a late diagnosis in 95% of cases as patients look for cheaper but uncharacterized treatments. Prevailing cancer treatment cost is too high around usd 15000/year. At times we experience high drug shortages. In addition are challenges of late presentation of 95% of patients. Early diagnosis, a public screening programme has started. It requires financial support.

Vaccinations against HPV causing cervical cancer and HBV, a risk factor for primary liver cancer highest in SADC etc to be developed locally and made widely available.

Sedentary lifestyle is an added risk factor in developing cancer. Africans should be active daily as they reverse bad eating habits in order to survive longer. They should also have good moral social habits which reduce sexual transmitted infections. The Cancer Nutrietics Campaign should cut across multiple sectors: Health, Education, Agriculture, Industry & Commerce

Professor Hilda Matarira: ZACB President and Director AFCC LabMed Internet Radio

Many dignitaries largely from the MHCC, Medical Laboratory and Clinical Scientist Council of Zimbabwe and Health Profession Authority Councils graced the launch.

Professor Hilda Matarira highlights were:

 as follows:

HEALTH INFORMATION EDUCATION

The ZACB has developed over 5 years an effective cancer & nutrietics HIE networks with the MHCC, tertiary institutions, Zimbabwe Public Health Association, UZ CHS etc. since the members share experience with El Microscopio, IFCC supported Internet Radio since the WorldLab Istanbul, Turkey in 2014. This resulted in FEN supported equipment grant to start an AFCC Internet Radio coordinated by ZACB YSs. AFCC LabMed IR if fully funded with some USD 25,000/year, can be an effective integrative tool in MHCC in AFCC. Current ZACB initiative in the development of integrated digital health in all disciplines is most welcome.

In Zimbabwe, there are some 25000 HPA members. In addition, there are 1300 students at Colleges of Health Sciences of 5 universities/year. These students are trained annually for Masters and Doctorate degree qualifications using a large pool of 100 experts/supervisors over the past 38 years. The well trained HR will be capable to participate in integrated activities in public health from villages to highest health institutions.

PROMOTE LIFE STYLE CHANGES

Promotions of Walks for pleasure and life, exercise at least 30min/day, adopt a sport & healthy diets i.e. fresh: cooked as recommended. Warm water drinking should also be preferred.

VACCINATIONS

The MHCC started a trial HPV vaccination programme in primary school girls under 9 year. The UZ CHS is seeking private partners to produce local vaccines together with Veterinary Services Department. The vaccines would be relevant to local genomics, hence more effective at reduced cost.

PROMOTE PRODUCTION OF HEALTHLY CROPS

Local production and use of fruits, vegetables ,whole grains crops impact positively on health at reduced costs.

Industry is being approached to reduce refining foods, increase high soluble fibre & reduce costs of healthy products. The advocacy will include parliament to regulate foods fibre content as done successful with local iodisation of salt.

 CHRONIC DISEASES & CHALLENGES

Africa has a high burden of chronic diseases. Cancer has a long duration causing a heavy burden cost to both patients & relatives. The challenges include poverty, poor diets, coinfections, polluted air and water, continued inflammation immunity & low  tumour suppressing genes activity.In addition, there is late diagnosis  limited patients’ information, knowledge and lack of integrated healthcare

TREATMENT of CANCER

 Natural non-toxic micro nutrietics have been developed ready for national clinical evaluation.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND TRAINING: PATIENTS AND STUDENTS CENTRED

ZACB recommends vertical and horizontal integration of health services and training, increased use of technology & modernization of all MHCC services .

ECONOMICS:

Africa to out-law poverty.

RECRUITEMENT OF VOLUNTEERS

ZACB is recruiting volunteers countrywide to carry out advocacy, participate in HIE & fundraise to assist in National Cancer Nutrietics Cure Campaign.

MEDICAL INNOVATIONS

CID Nutrietics: POCTs and POC Devices are being developed at about  1/3000 of cost. These are cheaper more available and affordable local products.

Highlights of Prof Tomris Ozben’s Launch Speech:

She gave a brief introduction about IFCC and its support for ZACB and AFCC. The vision of IFCC is to advance excellence in laboratory medicine for better healtcare worldwide. She mentioned about the IFCC Foundation for Emerging Nations (FEN). Her presentation continued with cancer and the effects of dietary and endogenous antioxidants. Although antioxidants have been demonstrated having preventive effects in cancer development, there are conflicting views of antioxidant use during cancer therapy and their potential interactions with radiation and chemotherapy. On one side, antioxidants protect and repair healthy cells that are damaged by chemotherapy or radiation therapy, decreasing severe side effects. On the other side, ample literature report that concurrent administration of antioxidants may interfere and eliminate ROS generated by chemotherapy and radiation therapy, therefore, their use should be avoided during cancer therapy. This argument continues, not only among scientists, but also in the media and among patients. These are big questions with no easy answers. There is an obvious need to identify and characterize if antioxidants taken concurrently interfere with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, help normal cells to survive or tumor cells to thrive. Although many chemotherapy drugs induce the formation of ROS, their anticancer effects do not, in general, depend on the formation of these free radicals. Consequently, antioxidant supplementation may in some circumstances help to prevent free-radical-induced side effects without inhibiting the positive effects of the chemotherapy and provides a safe and effective means of enhancing the response to cancer chemotherapy. Many cancer patients develop some form of clinical malnutrition and die not from cancer, but from malnutrition related complications. According to the available evidence, it seems logical to advice taking antioxidants naturally from a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, rather than consumption of antioxidant supplements. Many food supplements readily available in the market have no effect, at the opposite, sometimes producing negative health effects, a supreme caution is imperative when offering patients such supplements. It is also known that nutrients may act much differently on humans when isolated from their natural matrix, and the synergistic effects of the intact natural product are lost. The effect of antioxidant supplements taken at high pharmacological doses over years on cancer is expected to be different from their effects at physiological doses taken as part of a diet.

After the launch ZACB together with the Medical community celebrated the launch with a public lecture given by Professr Ozben on: Current Applications and Future Developments in Liquid Profiling in Cancer Diagnosis.